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Probate

Thursday, June 09, 2016

Minnesota Probate Law: Intestate Succession Rules for Inheritance
If you die without a will, Minnesota Probate Law provides one for you. In determining how your assets will be distributed, the court will look at the laws for intestate (meaning no Will) succession (priority to get stuff). Read on to learn more about how the court will be required to divvy up your assets.

Read more . . .


Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Prince Didn't Have a Will? Now What?

As you know, music superstar Prince died last week. Yesterday, his sister, Tyka Nelson, filed documents with the probate court stating that he did not have a will.

Now what?


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Tuesday, April 26, 2016

MN Estate Planning: The Power of Joint Tenancy

Minnesota has two types of real estate ownership where there are multiple owners but only one avoids the lengthy and costly probate process...


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Tuesday, April 19, 2016

What Is a Probate Asset?
A client calls because her husband recently passed away and she went to the bank to get the money out of an old checking account he had in just his name. But, the bank told her the money in the account is now a probate asset and they won't give it to her until after probate? What do they mean by a probate asset?

Read more . . .


Tuesday, April 12, 2016

Who Really Owns Your Home
I’ve had numerous clients who believed their homes were owned jointly only to discover that only of them was actually listed on the deed. If the person listed on the deed was the one who died, we need to ask the court for help transferring the home to the surviving spouse. Don't let this happen to you.


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Tuesday, March 22, 2016

Don't Give Up Your Power. Act as Executor For a Loved One's Estate!

Someone you love has died. You have the right to act as the executor (personal representative) to guide their estate through the Minnesota probate process. But, for whatever reason (time, effort, fear etc...) you are thinking about stepping aside to allow someone else to act. DON'T DO IT. The only way to protect yourself is to act as the personal representative. Do not give up your power to ensure the wishes of your loved one are followed via the Minnesota probate process!


Read more . . .


Monday, June 08, 2015

A Minneapolis Estate Planning Attorney Explains Why You Should Add Your Spouse to the Deed to Your House

A Minneapolis Estate Planning Attorney Explains the Pros of Adding Your Spouse to the Deed to Your House

Many people erroneously assume that when one spouse dies, the other spouse receives all of the remaining assets; this is often not true and frequently results in unintentional disinheritance of the surviving spouse.

In cases where a couple shares a home but only one spouse’s name is on it, the home will not automatically pass to the surviving pass, if his or her name is not on the title. Take, for example, a case of a husband and wife where the husband purchased a home prior to his marriage, and consequently only his name is on the title (although both parties resided there, and shared expenses, during the marriage). Should the husband pass away before his wife, the home will not automatically pass to her by “right of survivorship”. Instead, it will become part of his probate estate.

This means that there will need to be a court probate case opened and a personal representative (executor) appointed. If the husband had a will, this would be the person he nominated in his will to carry out his instructions regarding disposition of the assets. If he did not have a will, Minnesota probate law states who has priority to serve as personal representative AND inherit the assets.

Take our above example; if the husband died without a will, Minnesota probate law determines who is entitled to the home. Under Minnesota law, if the husband in our example had children, even if they are the children from the current marriage, the surviving spouse is only entitled to a life estate in the home. The “remainder interest” goes to the kids. If this is a second marriage, children from the prior marriage may be entitled to more of the estate. A life estate with a remainder interest means the surviving spouse has strict limitations on what she can do with the home. For instance, she can’t sell the home.

I am currently handling several probate matters where the surviving spouse was not on the house deed.

Laws of inheritance are complex, and without proper planning, surviving loved ones may be subjected to unintended expense, delays and legal hardships. If you share a residence with a significant other or spouse, you should consult with an attorney to determine the best course of action after taking into account your unique personal situation and goals. There may be simple ways to ensure your wishes are carried out and avoid having to probate your spouse’s estate at death.

Contact a Minnesota Estate Planning Lawyer today to assist with adding your spouse to the deed to your home.


Monday, June 01, 2015

What [Not] To Do After a Death: Seven things personal representatives should never do

A Minnesota Probate Lawyer Cautions Against Certain Actions When You Act as a Personal Representative (Executor)

1. NEVER distribute estate assets until there has been a full assessment of potential claims against the estate.

Minnesota statutes require that probates remain open for at least four months. This gives creditors adequate time to notify the personal representative of potential claims. Distributing assets before the expiration of this four-month creditors’ claims period opens the personal representative to liability if there is not enough money to pay the claims.

2. NEVER use the estate’s funds for personal expenses.

The personal representative has a duty to act in the best interests of the estate. “Borrowing” the estate’s funds or misappropriating the funds is the same as stealing someone else’s money. It’s better to start clean and immediately open an estate bank account and run all the estate money through it.

3. NEVER neglect tax issues.

Ordinarily it is the responsibility of the personal representative to file the estate’s tax returns. Failure to do so could cause penalties and expose the personal representative to liability.

4. NEVER ignore a court order.

As a condition to being appointed, the personal representative agrees to submit to the jurisdiction of the court. This means obeying court orders and local rules and following Minnesota probate statutes. Disobeying the court could result in personal liability against the personal representative, or worse, the court ordering the personal representative to appear before it to explain why you disobeyed the court. It is within the court’s power order jail time or a fine for a personal representative who disobeys a court order.

5. NEVER distribute the last of the funds in the estate until a full final accounting has been done and all debts paid. I handled a probate where the only asset was the decedent’s home. The home was sold and a check issued to each beneficiary for the full amount of the sale price. At the end of the probate, the personal representative did not have enough cash on had to reimburse himself the full amount of legal fees paid to handle the probate.

It’s much more difficult (almost impossible) to get money back from someone once it’s been paid out. Far easier, 

6. NEVER ignore a claim.

Minnesota probate law requires creditors to submit a claim against the estate in order to get paid. The creditors will notify the personal representative of potential claims. The personal representative should carefully review each claim. If he/she doesn’t think it’s legitimate (or owed) the PR MUST notify the creditor of the disallowance of the claim within 2 months of receipt of the claim.

I had a client who ignored a claim (despite my repeated warnings) and the two months passed without him filing a notice of disallowance. He then asked if he could dispute the claim. Unfortunately, it was too late to dispute the claim even though he had a good case for disallowance. He was then forced to work with the creditor to settle the claim.

I know it’s a difficult time working through a probate after the death of a loved one, but please don’t simply ignore issues. It’s my job to help you tackle these problems, so work with me.

7. NEVER proceed without counsel.

Minnesota’s probate laws are complex even for seasoned attorneys. Making mistakes can be costly to the estate and can even cause the personal representative to become personally liable for the mistakes. Even before a probate proceeding is commenced, there are many issues that need to be dealt with, including how to handle creditor claims, deciding on the right place to open the probate, choosing the appropriate type of probate proceeding, and interpreting the decedent’s Will correctly in light of Minnesota probate law.

Because of the risks involved, probate is not the kind of legal proceeding that should be done “on the cheap.” I have met with numerous personal representatives who originally thought they could handle it on their own then hit a wall and had to seek immediate help to fix something. You should work with an experienced Minnesota probate lawyer to ensure you don’t make a costly mistake.

Hire a knowledgeable and experienced Minnesota probate attorney before you start a probate to be sure it’s handled properly from the very beginning.

Download a copy of this document: Five Things Personal Representatives Should Never Do.


Monday, May 25, 2015

What’s Involved in Serving as a Personal Representative in a Minnesota Probate?

A Minneapolis Probate Lawyer Explains Some of the Tasks Associated With Acting as a Personal Representative for an Estate

The personal representative is the person designated in a Will as the individual who is responsible for performing a number of tasks necessary to wind down the decedent’s affairs. [While a will merely nominates someone to act as personal representative subject to approval by the court, this post uses the term “personal representative” to refer both to the nominated and appointed personal representative.] Generally, the personal representative’s responsibilities involve taking charge of the deceased person’s assets, notifying beneficiaries and creditors, paying the estate’s debts and distributing the property to the beneficiaries. The personal representative may also be a beneficiary of the Will, though he or she must treat all beneficiaries fairly and in accordance with the provisions of the Will.

The first priority for a personal representative is to find out if the deceased had a valid Will.  Then the personal representative should locate the original Will.  The personal representative should also be sure to order certified copies of the Death Certificate if that hasn’t already been done.  The personal representative will be responsible for notifying all persons who have an interest in the estate, including those who are named as beneficiaries in the Will and any known creditors. A list of all assets must be compiled, including value at the date of death.

The personal representative must take steps to secure all assets, whether by taking possession of them, or by obtaining adequate insurance. Assets of the estate include all real and personal property owned by the decedent; overlooked assets sometimes include stocks, bonds, pension funds, bank accounts, safety deposit boxes, annuity payments, holiday pay, and work-related life insurance or survivor benefits. The personal representative must also compile a list of the decedent’s debts, including, credit card accounts, loan payments, mortgages, home utilities, tax arrears, alimony and outstanding leases.

Whether the Will must be probated depends on a variety of factors, including size of the estate and how the decedent’s assets were titled. An experienced probate or estate planning attorney can help determine whether probate is required, and assist with carrying out the personal representative’s duties. If the estate must go through probate, the personal representative must file the appropriate documents with the probate court in order to be appointed legal representative. Upon approval of the appointment, the court will issue a document called Letters Testamentary authorizing the personal representative to act on behalf of the estate to pay all of the decedent’s outstanding debts, provided there are sufficient assets in the estate. After debts have been paid, the personal representative must distribute the remaining real and personal property to the beneficiaries, in accordance with the wishes set forth in the Will. Because the personal representative is accountable to the beneficiaries of the estate, it is extremely important to keep complete, accurate records of all expenditures, correspondence, asset distribution, and filings with the court and government agencies.

The personal representative is also responsible for filing all tax returns for the deceased person including federal and state income tax returns and estate tax filings, if applicable. Please note that Minnesota law entitles a personal representative to reasonable compensation for his or her services.  Unfortunately, there is no guidance offered on the appropriate amount of this fee so it’s a good idea to discuss compensation with other family members to avoid later disputes.  I find it helpful to spell out the compensation in the will so that others know and understand that the deceased intended to offer payment to the personal representative.


Monday, May 18, 2015

Expenses of the Estate, Part IV: Fees Received as Personal Representative (Executor) are Taxable!

A Minnesota Probate Attorney Explains That Fees Received for Acting as a Personal Representative (Executor) Are Taxable

Serving as a personal representative takes a lot of time. As a result, some personal representatives consider charging the estate for their time as permitted under Minnesota law.

As appealing as that can be, the attorney should help the personal representative consider all the consequences of that decision. One consequence that is often overlooked is that fees paid to the personal representative are taxable and must be included in their gross income. As a result, the estate may be required to generate a 1099.

Contact a Minnesota Probate Lawyer to discuss your rights and obligations as executor.


Monday, May 11, 2015

Expenses of the Estate, Part III: D0 I Get Paid To Act As Personal Representative (Executor)?

Minnesota Probate Attorney Explains Compensation for a Personal Representative 

You are nominated as a personal representative to handle someone’s estate. Can you get paid for handling these matters? In a word, yes.

Your fee is dictated by Minnesota probate law. Unfortunately, Minnesota law doesn’t provide much guidance as the probate law simply says, “[a] personal representative is entitled to reasonable compensation for services.”

What does that mean?

It’s not really clear. The courts have generally stated that they know an unreasonable fee when they see one. But, they have failed to provide guidance on what constitutes a reasonable fee.

A personal representative is always entitled to be reimbursed for any expenses related to the probate. For instance, paying for filing fees, copies of the death certificate, publishing fees, attorney’s fees, accountant fees etc.…

I often suggest to clients that they state the fee they want to get up front to the rest of the family so there is no argument later.  This can be a flat amount of the estate ($5,000) or an hourly fee and the PR can simply track their time spent working on the probate.

Are fees received for acting as personal representative taxable?  See the next post for the answer.

Work with a Minnesota probate lawyer to ensure that you are getting paid a fair amount for the work you put in to handling an estate.


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From within Hennepin County Unique Estate Law represents clients throughout Minnesota, including Minneapolis, Edina, Bloomington, St. Louis Park, Minnetonka, Plymouth, Wayzata, Maple Grove, St. Paul, and Brooklyn Park.



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