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Minneapolis Estate Planning and Probate Lawyer Blog

Sunday, July 26, 2015

I Just Moved to Minnesota. Do I Need a New Will?

A Minneapolis Estate Planning Attorney Discusses How Moving to Minnesota Affects Your Estate Plan

Minnesota’s economy is booming with one of the lowest unemployment rates in the country and this means that people are moving here to take advantage of our great standard of living. As a result, I often receive calls from people asking if they need to update their estate plans due to the move.

In general, wills or living trusts that are valid in one state should be valid in all states. However, if you’ve recently moved to Minnesota, it’s highly recommended that you consult a Minnesota estate planning attorney. This is because states can have very different laws regarding all aspects of estate planning. For example, some allow you to use a handwritten will, but Minnesota does not.

And, as a practical matter, you want to ensure that the proper people are able to get their hands on your legal documents. This may prove difficult if they are all still located in another state.

Another event that can cause problems with moving and estate planning is moving from a community property state to a common law state, such as Minnesota. In community property states, all property earned or acquired during marriage is generally owned in equal halves by each spouse, with some exceptions, such as any property received by only one of them through gift or inheritance. The property that is considered community property includes income, anything acquired with income during the marriage, and any separate property that is transformed into community property. Separate property includes anything owned by either spouse before marriage, property received by only one spouse by gift or inheritance, and any property earned by one spouse after permanent separation. One spouse is not required in community property states to leave his or her half of the community property to another spouse, although many do.

In common law states, property acquired during a marriage is not automatically owned by both spouses. In common law states, the spouse who earns money and acquires property owns it by himself or herself, unless he or she chooses to share it with his or her spouse. Common law states usually have rules to protect a surviving spouse from being disinherited.

You will also want to make sure that your Health Care Directive and Power of Attorney are valid in Minnesota. Minnesota law is very specific about the form of your Power of Attorney so you should have this redone to match. Otherwise, you risk having a bank, or other institution, reject it.

As you can see, the laws of different states vary significantly with respect to incapacity planning, estate planning and inheritance rights. Therefore, it’s important to contact an estate planning attorney in your new area, especially if you are moving from a community property state to a common law state.

​Minnesota Estate Planning Attorney

New to Minnesota? Contact an experienced estate planning attorney now!


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From within Hennepin County Unique Estate Law represents clients throughout Minnesota, including Minneapolis, Edina, Bloomington, St. Louis Park, Minnetonka, Plymouth, Wayzata, Maple Grove, St. Paul, and Brooklyn Park.



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| Phone: 952-955-7623
333 Washington Avenue North, Minneapolis, MN 55401
| Phone: 952-955-7623
5775 Wayzata Blvd., St. Louis Park, MN 55416
| Phone: 952-955-7623

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